Apr 5, 2009

Lead us in paths of righteousness

I love Maggie! She joined our family two years ago Christmas. At first Jennifer was not sure about the competition, but over time, she has come to accept her. Today, Jennifer likes Maggie. Maggie loves to tell me where to go. But she can be really upset when I don't go where she tells me. I have also come to find out that Maggie doesn't like where I live. She also goes nuts when I drive down Mary Ann Cleveland Way. She starts blurting out all sorts of things that don't make sense. Sometimes I wish there was a switch to turn her off. Oh, wait a minute, there is! Yes, in case you haven't figured it out yet, Maggie is a GPS unit. She's my Magellan Maestro Global Positioning Navigation System. We call her, "Maggie" for short.

 

We thought we were cute when we named her "Maggie". But it appears that we are not original at all. Everyone has named the voice that comes through their GPS. My father has a NUVI680 and he calls her "Noovie". Sometimes the names make sense. Take the Garmin GPS unit. Some people call her "Minnie". One man wanted to call her "Garmina"  but his wife thought that was stupid and they settled on "Gina". But others are much, much, more clever.

 

Apparently the Nuvi680 has a British voice and so one clever young man calls her "Mary Poppins". Another man was upset that the unit continued to recalculate all the time. He was so annoyed by her nagging voice he called her the name of his first wife.

 

GPS units are everywhere and they can be really handy. But sometimes they do get confused. We were using Maggie in downtown Tucson and she told me to leave 6th Street. She sent me down 5th Street instead. I went through 10 stop signs and crossed two major streets and then she told me to get back on 6th Street. "I COULD HAVE SAVED 10 MINUTES"  I yelled to her. She didn't seem to notice. My wife thinks it's funny that I scream at a computer.

 

But a recent study out of England confirms that GPS units are not perfect. The British Automobile Association found that 55 percent of GPS users find the unit distracting. A similar number said the directions were poor. In fact, this week a lady in Langlade, Wisconsin relied too much on her GPS unit. She was instructed to drive down a snowmobile trail! She got so stuck she had to call 911 to get rescued.

 

Actually, the only true reliable directions in life don't come from a computer. They come from God's word. Scripture has so much good direction, and yet sometimes people don't even turn the unit on. But the greatest thing is that when we fail to take the path that God desires, he doesn't continue to scream at us. Through the forgiveness of His Son Jesus, he gently brings us back to the right path.

 

Blessings,

 

Pastor David Hook