Oct 10, 2009

An old fly tale

An old fly tale
A wise old Texan once told me the best way to repel flies.  It may seem strange, but believe me... it works.  First you take a baggie and fill it with water.  Then you place four pennies in the bottom of the baggie.  Then, hang the bag in the doorway.  If you watch, you'll notice that flies will never enter through the doorway.  The water baggies turn them away.  As I said, it works!
Everyone is trying to build a better mousetrap.  But what we really need are better fly traps.  My grandfather built one that was quite ingenious.  It was a screened box with an inverted screen cone at the bottom.  This whole apparatus was placed over tasty fly food... in other words, really stinky stuff.  As the flies left the fly food, they would rise into the cone and enter into this fly trap.  Since the opening at the bottom was so small, the flies were stuck.  They couldn't exit.
Flypaper also works.  The flies are attracted to the sweet paper, but then they stick.  It works great, but pretty soon the flypaper looks disgusting.  Another really effective fly deterrent is a fan.  Some stores will have large fans over the main doorway.  The air is blowing so strong it is difficult for the flies to pass.  But this solution only works in large doorways.  It is really too cumbersome and expensive for a simple house doorway.
No, the best solution is the baggie full of water.  As I said, it works.
At least I used to think so.  Apparently some researcher wanted to test out this theory.  Not wanting to leave well enough alone, Mike Stringham of North Carolina State University actually performed an experiment.  His 13-week experiment placed “spot cards” near water bags filled with water.  He also placed “spot cards” on control bags.  After meticulously counting fly droppings, he reached an interesting conclusion. The results?  Apparently the flies are more attracted to the bags of water.  In other words, instead of repelling flies, the baggies attracted them.
Argh.  It's amazing how we get these old wives tales in our head and they stick.  Thank goodness for the scientific method.  But while I love the scientific method, there are some things that can never be proved.  We can make reasonable inferences from the data, but that's about it.
There are some that will say that religion is a wives tale.  They believe that as science answers more and more questions, religion will go away.  Yet often times instead of answering questions, the pursuit of science opens up more questions.  In other words, the more we experiment, the less we find we know.
No, faith isn't the antithesis of science.  It's a lens through which we view science.  Science can answer many questions, but science cannot contain God. God always leaves room for faith.  Not everything can be explained.
At least that's what the wise Texan once told me.  Thanks mom!
Blessings,
Pastor David Hook
A wise old Texan once told me the best way to repel flies.  It may seem strange, but believe me... it works.  First you take a baggie and fill it with water.  Then you place four pennies in the bottom of the baggie.  Then, hang the bag in the doorway.  If you watch, you'll notice that flies will never enter through the doorway.  The water baggies turn them away.  As I said, it works!
Everyone is trying to build a better mousetrap.  But what we really need are better fly traps.  My grandfather built one that was quite ingenious.  It was a screened box with an inverted screen cone at the bottom.  This whole apparatus was placed over tasty fly food... in other words, really stinky stuff.  As the flies left the fly food, they would rise into the cone and enter into this fly trap.  Since the opening at the bottom was so small, the flies were stuck.  They couldn't exit.

Flypaper also works.  The flies are attracted to the sweet paper, but then they stick.  It works great, but pretty soon the flypaper looks disgusting.  Another really effective fly deterrent is a fan.  Some stores will have large fans over the main doorway.  The air is blowing so strong it is difficult for the flies to pass.  But this solution only works in large doorways.  It is really too cumbersome and expensive for a simple house doorway.

No, the best solution is the baggie full of water.  As I said, it works.

At least I used to think so.  Apparently some researcher wanted to test out this theory.  Not wanting to leave well enough alone, Mike Stringham of North Carolina State University actually performed an experiment.  His 13-week experiment placed “spot cards” near water bags filled with water.  He also placed “spot cards” on control bags.  After meticulously counting fly droppings, he reached an interesting conclusion. The results?  Apparently the flies are more attracted to the bags of water.  In other words, instead of repelling flies, the baggies attracted them.

Argh.  It's amazing how we get these old wives tales in our head and they stick.  Thank goodness for the scientific method.  But while I love the scientific method, there are some things that can never be proved.  We can make reasonable inferences from the data, but that's about it.

There are some that will say that religion is a wives tale.  They believe that as science answers more and more questions, religion will go away.  Yet often times instead of answering questions, the pursuit of science opens up more questions.  In other words, the more we experiment, the less we find we know.

No, faith isn't the antithesis of science.  It's a lens through which we view science.  Science can answer many questions, but science cannot contain God. God always leaves room for faith.  Not everything can be explained.

At least that's what the wise Texan once told me.  Thanks mom!

Blessings,

Pastor David Hook